s who were graced with the opportunity of reading Mark O’Brien’s insightful and thought provoking article upon its initial publication in 1990 must have been touched by the profoundness of the story and the raw streak of honesty which prevails in the author’s recollection of a journey which triggered and fulfilled the exploration of his sexuality. Yet, it is the 2012 adaptation of O’Brien’s article under the name of The Sessions starring John Hawkes as Mark O’Brien and Helen Hunt as sex surrogate Cheryl Cohen-Greene that delves into a greater comprehension of the psychological elements of disability, which is a state that for the most part has always been associated with physical consequences rather than accepting the emotional characteristics which are linked with it.The elements that transform the article On Seeing a Sex Surrogate into the motion picture The Sessions are rooted in O’Brien’s discussion of his life’s intimate details openly with the priest, the development of a bond of love between himself and Cheryl and his discovery of a life partner in Susan. These factors reemphasize and restate the idea that the positive molding of an individual’s psychological state through love, acceptance and understanding can trigger a profound change in one’s self-image. While, this phenomenon is gradually observed by the audience throughout the course of the film it is eventually witnessed and reaffirmed when the emotional outburst of the three most important women in his life – his nurse, Cheryl and his life partner in the last phase of his existence is projected at Mark’s funeral. Therefore, The Sessions is an insight into the life of disabled individuals who have to fight through life dealing with psychological issues that are prompted by the negative attitude of society and religious construct towards invalids’ sexuality and how these issues can be resolved through the application of positive psychology including the transformation