Though the positive change and awareness of existence may not justify the tragic or terrible end of the literature, and may even prove to be contradictory to the desired end, it provides an evident space for the discussion and debate of ethical norms, which in turn, suggests that there are lessons to be learned from the story.The conceptual framework of a story, a novel, a play, or a poem, along with other literary ideas utilized by the author, provides the much-needed base for a well-developed epiphany. In most cases, the epiphany is not an apparent device, and perhaps, just closely related and attributed to the dénouement of the plot. What sets an epiphany from such climatic events and falling resolutions is that it occurs abruptly and endures briefly (Maltby 120). The process is self-contained, it occurs within the character, inside his mental constraints, within his very own thinking. Thus, in this sense, epiphanies can be talked of as the driving force behind the climax and the succeeding events in the story, and should not be paralleled with tipping points that speak of structural ideals of a story.There exists a considerable tendency in the literature to associate epiphany with Joyce’s literary creations. Gradually, with the enthusiasm of critical studies and analyses of his works, epiphanies became accepted as the central metaphor of the aesthetic theory which encompassed James Joyce’s works (Bowen 103). Joyce’s major works are thus said to be a proliferation of epiphanies, and the essence of these moments engenders the poignant conclusion of the characters’ fate.Joyce’s use of epiphany as a literary device has been the foreground on which the term achieved its popularity in literature. Literary critics and scholars who have studied his 1914 publication of a short story collection, Dubliners, recognize that there is a moment of deep self-realizationin each of his stories and that these moments create a sudden reversal in the characters’ view of themselves or the society at large.