There are several issues that deal with the health care system which can increase the tension of health care staff, especially, nurses who take care of critically ill patients. For example, the death of a patient simply increases nurses’ consciousness of their own losses and intensifies their fear of demise, thus raising nervousness and stress level. Studies have shown that burnout and stress may differ among nursing specialties. For example, nurses working in palliative care may experience less stress compared to nurses who work in areas such as oncology. However, the reasons which cause undue stress in all specialties should be addressed and it is proved that alcohol, drug use, depression, and suicidal tendency are a serious concern among health care professionals. (Chochinov, H., Breitbart, W. 2000. p. 303–19).It is very important to recognize and control the causes and symptoms of stress among nurses because then only they can provide the care which is required for critically ill patients. Moreover, there is a possibility that the care provided may be compromised if the nurses fail to care for themselves due to grief and loss. (Ellis, S. 1997. 3(4):197–202). Now several nurses experience stress while taking care of critically ill patients. Lack of hospital resources and the reduction in nursing staff have made things become worse, and several nurses find themselves avoiding patients and their families. at home, they feel exhausted and irritable. They even question their ability to provide good care because of job stress they experience. Though it is not possible to eliminate all the factors which create stress, it can be reduced by self- care. There is a general tendency among health care professionals to look for external solutions to problems. But they should give more attention to their inner life i.e., their feelings, thoughts, and actions. They should also develop self-confidence i.e., trusting intuition and instinct. They also must try to develop healthy professional and personal relationships.